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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
that and in exchange for some minor tweaking of medicare, but nothing that really gives the republicans too big a win on that issue. and they would also argue, to gloria's point earlier, that you actually need this. this is not just a win for democrats, you need it because you need democratic votes to get this through because you're going to lose so many republicans who simply won't vote to extend the debt ceiling under any circumstances. so that's the calculus if you went with the middle deal, there would be an entirely different math for a tax reform package if you went with that larger deal that's more in the $4 trillion range. >> the irony here to me is that a larger deal would in many ways be easier to cut because it's so obvious what you would have to do. if you do a smaller deal, then you have to have eric cantor lay out by piece by piece by piece, cut by cut, by cut, what he would do if you don't have the revenue side of it. >> but to get the bigger deal, you need trust that they would actually then do comprehensive tax reform, rewrite the code so the republicans would make the case we didn't
tonight, the house speaker john boehner i'm told is telling president obama he's open to discussing a big deficit reduction package, somewhere in the ballpark of $3 trillion over ten years. but first, though, speaker boehner said it's imperative that his members telling him the senate vote first on the house plan, cut, cap, and balance, if it fail fails, then look for th negotiations to continue. >>> key elements of the republican establishment are trying to nudge the hard line conservatives to a compromise. defaulting on our debt is not an option. it has real, immediate, and potentially catastrophic consequences. the ratings agency standard and poor's sent a team to capitol hill saying not raising the debt ceiling would stain america's credit rating and drive up interest costs for everyone. many house conservatives, though, aren't ready to give up and some of them won't budge. they say if there's any new taxes in this deal at the end, they would rather have the first default in american history. >>> in our new cnn/orc poll gives us a fresh sense of what you think. 34% of americans say an
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)